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Today, July 28, is the world day dedicated to disease, a viral infection which, if left untreated, can become chronic and www elpa cause liver cirrhosis and liver cancer.

As confirmed by the World Health Organization, the disease affects over 354 million people worldwide and, every day, over 8 thousand new infections of hepatitis B and C occur, two of the five main strains of the hepatitis virusToday, July 28, “the World Health Organization joins the world community to celebrate World Hepatitis Day on www elpa”.

Thus begins the WHO statement announcing this anniversary dedicated to a disease that affects over 354 million people worldwide and for which, every day, over 8 thousand new infections of hepatitis B and C occur, two of the five main strains of the virus. hepatitis, a viral infection which, if left untreated, can become chronic and cause liver cirrhosis and liver cancer.

With the slogan “Hepatitis cannot wait”, WHO wants to raise awareness in all countries of the world to work together to eliminate viral hepatitis as a “threat to public health”, by 2030. A future free from hepatitis is only achievable “with a joint effort,” experts say.The numbers of the WHOdeepeningHepatitis, Ecdc: in Europe only about 20% of cases are diagnosed

As mentioned, there are five main strains of the hepatitis virus: A, B, C, D and E. Together, hepatitis B and C, considered the most dangerous, cause 1.1 million deaths and 3 million new infections. per year in the world, according to the www elpa with WHO.

The lack of diagnosis and lack of treatment weighs heavily. In fact, in the world, only 10% of people who have a chronic hepatitis B infection are diagnosed and, of these, only 22% receive treatment. And 6 out of 10 babies are not given the vaccine at birth. Therefore, the WHO reiterates, “although progress has been made in the response to hepatitis, there is still a long way to go”.

In fact, in too many countries around the world, priority interventions against the disease that manifests itself through liver inflammation remain inaccessible to the most severely affected or highest-risk populations. As for hepatitis C, the WHO has set the goal of eliminating the virus that causes it, HCV, as a public health problem, by 2030, with the aim of diagnosing 90% of patients. with hepatitis and treat 80% of those diagnosed.

According to the data, however, only 21% of the 58 million people with chronic HCV infection were diagnosed in 2019. And www elpa, of these patients, only 9.4 million, or 62%, were treated with direct-acting antivirals, capable of defeating the virus. That is why the WHO wanted to draw up new guidelines to promote self-testing for hepatitis C, an effective tool for accelerating progress towards achieving global goals.

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